This year, breast cancer patients designed their own ribbons and shared their unique stories.

Will you sponsor a ribbon?

This year, we celebrate Pink Ribbon’s 15th anniversary! As our Pink Ribbon team is very proud to achieve this, we wanted to make sure to give a special touch to this edition. That’s why this time, we did not choose a Belgian celebrity to design our ribbon, but we asked (former) breast cancer patients to draw their own version. That way, they could share their own stories on how they experienced their diagnosis and treatment. What became clear from those stories is that every single patient follows their own, unique journey. For that reason it became extremely hard for us to choose one specific design. But eventually we managed to select three designs as an inspiration for our new ribbon of 2022!

But because of the fact that the other stories also touched us so deeply, we did not want to withold them from you. Therefore, you can find those courageous testimonies along with their accompanying ribbon on this page. 

Which story moves you the most? Show your support by sponsoring that ribbon.

Top 10 Ribbons

1

Veerle Van Roeyen

Raised so far

279.00

2

Sylvie De Bruyne

Raised so far

206.10

3

Ann Reniers

Raised so far

190.10

4

Joke Vermeren

Raised so far

159.00

5

Leen Potums

Raised so far

141.90

6

I support all

Raised so far

122.68

7

Lindsey Peeters

Raised so far

105.90

8

Martine Lemmens

Raised so far

104.50

9

Nancy Aillery

Raised so far

85.60

10

Kathy De Loose

Raised so far

58.30

Ann Reniers

My story

Raised so far

190.10

Ann Reniers

My life changed drastically because of breast cancer. Life is finite and that became very clear very quickly. I enjoyed being creative with my hands, but I never made enough time for it. Because of breast cancer, I began to do so. I took courses in ceramics and drawing. I also started to value the little everyday things even more. Enjoying a nice cup of coffee, an intimate hug, a moment of rest, … My ribbon is a combination of the difficult periods and the beautiful moments. The heart represents myself, trapped in my own body. The mountains represent the difficult course that subsides and fades away after a while. The stars are my bright spots: my husband, my two sons, and my parents. The pink symbolises the energy of life that continues to grow.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=6

Nadien Vandamme

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Nadien Vandamme

When you’re told that you have breast cancer on both sides, the world slips away from under you. You immediately start to have dark thoughts, and the fear of dying creeps into your mind. But you have to fight and stay positive: everything will be okay. The moment the doctors bring you the good news that they have been able to remove all the tumour is proof of that. I now have a completely different outlook on life. When I hear others complain about trivialities, I often think ‘what are you worrying about?’. Therefore, my ribbon is optimistic and radiates positivity, strength, and perseverance.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=39

Nathalie Biltresse

My story

Raised so far

21.20

Nathalie Biltresse

2020 was marked by 2 Cs for me: Covid and breast cancer. At the time of the diagnosis, you ask yourself ‘why me’? I’m 48 years old and haven’t missed my annual mammogram since I was 40. I don’t smoke or drink, I eat healthily, and I’m quite athletic – too much according to some. Fortunately, I could count on my daughters, then 18 years old. They were wonderful. I also had wonderful encounters in oncology with other fellow sufferers, the team of nurses, and, later, the volunteers in the wellness centre. The cancer taught me to unwind, calming the little tornado that was raging on all fronts, and helping me to discover a different me. On my ribbon I drew breasts. ‘Saved’ breasts, but also damaged breasts, with partial or full mastectomy scars or reconstructed breasts. Because after cancer, our breasts are different, but just as beautiful!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=53

Lies Vandeweghe

My story

Raised so far

21.20

Lies Vandeweghe

As soon as you’re ‘rid’ of it, everyone thinks you’re back to being your old self again. But that’s not the case: I’m no longer the energetic woman that I was before I got breast cancer. I miss my old body. Although I’m more aware of my own limits since my breast cancer diagnosis, I enjoy life much more than I used to. You can’t forget that after tough moments, beautiful moments also come. I think that’s so important, and I want to express it on my ribbon with the text ‘Never give up’. The pink ribbon with a black stripe at the beginning and end represents the heavy treatment and the loss of my old body.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=30

Kim Timmermans

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Kim Timmermans

Although the treatments were very tough, three years after my diagnosis I can say that breast cancer has brought me something beautiful. I have come to realise even more that friends and family are golden and it’s important to enjoy every day. Recently I started a webshop where I sell prosthetic lingerie. It’s my way of helping fellow sufferers to feel better about themselves again, both during and after their treatment. On my ribbon, I put different breasts with scars, because that can’t be avoided with breast cancer. It took time to accept my new body, but in my eyes all breasts are perfect, and their appearance doesn’t make any of us less of a woman. The white background symbolises a blank piece of paper. A new beginning which doesn’t have to be worse. I may be less carefree now, but I’m more aware of how lucky I am.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=36

Melissa Oury

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Melissa Oury

My grandmother died of breast cancer. The diagnosis hit hard, she had waited far too long and there was nothing more to be done. If she hadn’t been so selfless for others, the outcome could have been very different. So, the message is to go for regular checks. As a tribute to my grandmother, I have covered the ribbon with freesias. This flower represents unconditional love and honour and was her favourite flower.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=46

Joke Vermeren

My story

Raised so far

159.00

Joke Vermeren

There you are, on the operating table. Ready for your mastectomy. That last minute, right before the anaesthetic, is the worst. Realising that it has to be done, but not wanting it to happen. You are powerless in this. And you suddenly realise that there are two different time periods for you: a time before cancer and a time with cancer. But life goes on, no matter what. You can’t give up. After my last radiation treatment, I took my bike to the seaside to get the feeling that maybe life could go on again. And that’s why I put waves on the design of my ribbon. To me, they symbolise infinity and hope.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=29

Yo Van Russelt

My story

Raised so far

10.60

Yo Van Russelt

Since my diagnosis, I live much more consciously and enjoy each day more. During treatment, this was not always easy. Going bald and shaving off my hair was the most difficult moment for me. On the advice of my hairdresser, I went to the Matongé neighbourhood in Brussels. Many African women wear wigs and colourful clothing and that makes life very beautiful. It compensated for my lack of real hair. That’s why my ribbon has an African print.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=37

Cindy Uyttersprot

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Cindy Uyttersprot

When you’re told that you have breast cancer, you suddenly realise how very vulnerable you are. You live in constant fear and uncertainty. You also have to accept your new breast and take the time to grieve for the old one. After the operation, I was told that there were no metastases, which gave me a feeling of relief. It made me put things into perspective. I no longer understand when someone makes a mountain out of a molehill. One thing I wish for, is that more attention is paid to the emotional preparation and processing of the entire experience.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=24

San Sipido

My story

Raised so far

21.20

San Sipido

From the start, it’s like being on a rollercoaster ride without knowing when the ride will stop. You don’t have much time to think in the beginning. You undergo the placement of a catheter port, the start of chemotherapy, the examinations, the surgeries, the radiation, and the after-treatment. And all that comes after the most difficult part: the realisation that from now on you will go through life with a mutilated body. A mutilated body that is tired of all the operations. A mutilated body that suddenly goes into menopause with bones and joints that are stiff and painful. Everything takes effort. As a result, I live more consciously than before. I am grateful for every day that I can have fun and forget the pain for a while.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=9

Veronique Christiaens

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Veronique Christiaens

Like many women, shaving off my hair was the most difficult moment for me. And yet, I never lost my pride as a woman. With a strong dose of positivity and perseverance, I got through it and took more time for myself. That helped me as I’m usually the one thinking of others. Now others supported me, and it felt good. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone, all around you are helping hands – grab them!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=13

Andre Pauwels

My story

Raised so far

50.00

Andre Pauwels

Breast cancer has had a bit impact on my career. I used to be a technician, but the axillary resection forced me to quit my job and find something new. To be honest, I’m grateful for the forced career change as it has given me a more exciting and richer life. My ribbon exudes strength, like a phoenix rising again from the ashes after treatment. Every year, 100 men are diagnosed with breast cancer. I had support from my peers, helping me to realise that I’m not alone.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=12

Liliane Voet

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Liliane Voet

I was a self-employed hairdresser at home, working many hours a day in all circumstances: bronchitis, a broken foot, … nothing stopped me from working. Until the breast cancer diagnosis. Suddenly life as you knew it stops. Everything I had worked so hard for was gone. My world collapsed. My ribbon has many emotions: you go from being happy to being sad, angry, or down. What got me down were the people that you don’t hear from again after you tell them about your diagnosis or having to tell the story over and over again. But luckily, my husband took good care of me and my customers visited often.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=19

Lindsey Peeters

My story

Raised so far

105.90

Lindsey Peeters

My life has been completely changed by breast cancer and my ribbon symbolises the road I have travelled. The ribbon is pink, the colour of breast cancer, but I drew some footsteps on it. First black footsteps representing the dark period, then they gradually move to shades of grey for the occasional better days, before finally becoming a white step for hope. The road you have to take isn’t rosy, but support from friends or family is the best thing you can offer a fellow sufferer.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=23

Sophie Dargent

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Sophie Dargent

Unfortunately, I’m one of the low percentage of patients who are immediately told that their breast cancer has metastasised, and they are not curable. Despite this bad news, there are many days where I’m actually happier than ever before. The harsh diagnosis has given me the opportunity to enjoy life even more. On my Addicted to black, condemned to pink Facebook page, I keep my friends updated on my ‘cancer adventure’. As a metal fan, I prefer black. Therefore, my ribbon combines pink and black, symbolising my circle of friends. The lace represents my hobby as a seamstress. I design lingerie for cancer patients because cancer patients also want to wear beautiful lingerie.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=21

Natasja Maes

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Natasja Maes

You think you are intangible. You dance through life. Bad news: that affects others, but not your family. But then it does. From one moment to the next, your life comes to a halt. You stop dancing for a while. The music is on pause. You don’t feel sick, there’s nothing to see when people look at you. But you are, sick. Breast cancer has taught me to continue dancing, but in a quieter way. I hear the music more clearly. I am more aware of the movements and my dance partners. I make sure to be a wallflower sometimes, so I can watch others dance and enjoy. I no longer take dancing for granted. It’s a gift.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=5

Kathy De Loose

My story

Raised so far

58.30

Kathy De Loose

Getting breast cancer made me pause and realise that I need to do more things that I enjoy. It’s the little things in life that make you happy. My wedding day was already planned when I was diagnosed. Thanks to the ice cap, I still hair on my wedding day, and I’m intensely happy about that. My ribbon reflects the dark times with the moon, stars, and rain cloud, while the sun, flowers, and hearts represent the beautiful moments and the love that surrounds you. The stars are also there for the women who did not survive the disease.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=26

Laurence Bastin

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Laurence Bastin

When I was told I had breast cancer, I realised that I wasn’t invincible and nor were the people around me. The hardest part was accepting that I wasn’t in control anymore. Through this ordeal, I saw how powerful the love of those closest to me is. Today, hormone therapy is a daily reminder that life is precious. My ribbon represents the fluctuation of emotions on the thread of life because breast cancer is a personal journey.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=58

Marion Segnana

My story

Raised so far

10.60

Marion Segnana

The diagnosis announcement was the most difficult moment psychologically. I found it difficult to understand. With breast cancer, not everything is rosy. On the contrary, it is a bit of a rollercoaster. From diagnosis to treatment, I went through every emotion, and it was difficult to cope. When my husband took me in his arms and told me that together we’d beat the disease, it gave me courage. I imagined my ribbon as a very colourful wax fabric, predominantly pink and adorned with a few white feathers. The feather is synonymous with renewal, and after two years I’m convinced that cancer can be an opportunity to reinvent yourself.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=48

Katherine Persyn

My story

Raised so far

25.90

Katherine Persyn

Breast cancer has changed me tremendously. I have started to live more intensely and enjoy the little things in life more. Being able to wake up as a woman with two new breasts after the amputation is something I’m enormously grateful for. My pink ribbon therefore has a dark edge. The beginning of this dark colour symbolises the heavy, dark period. Next to it, I put little stars, two hands, and a lotus flower. The stars look down on us from above and symbolise those who are no longer with us but continue to inspire hope in so many of us. The lotus flower is a symbol of life. The two hands that are sending out hearts are a sign of love and warmth.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=33

Inga Van Gompel

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Inga Van Gompel

As a nurse in a radiology department, I’m usually on the other side of this. I take mammograms and sometimes see tumours. Suddenly, it’s my scan with the tumour. I’ve always felt sympathetic to my patients, but you only realise the kind of fear that the patient feels when you get the diagnosis yourself. It’s made me put things into perspective and stop worrying about trivialities. I’ve started to enjoy life more. That’s why I put a fist on my ribbon: it punches the tumour and defeats the disease.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=34

Eva Descamps

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Eva Descamps

Under the motto ‘prevention is better than cure’, I had preventative surgery. It took a lot of courage for me to undergo the genetic test. But once I knew the result, I decided to have the surgery. Although it’s not the same as someone who actually has breast cancer, the operation is still physically and emotionally difficult. My ribbon is pink and turquoise with a small hole or tear. The turquoise represents previvors, and the pink is for the survivors. The hole or tear refers to the flaw in genetics. So, the ribbon is colourful because life remains beautiful, even with defects.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=16

Sabrina Van den Bossche

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Sabrina Van den Bossche

How breast cancer didn’t change my life is the better question. I was a young mother of two young children when I was diagnosed. Your world suddenly comes to a standstill. After the chemo, the radiation, and the many pills and injections, I’m not the young woman I was before the diagnosis. Small tasks, which used to come naturally, are now difficult. I made my ribbon soft pink with vintage handheld mirrors on it. They’re all beautiful mirrors, but one has a crack: sometimes you feel broken inside, despite the beautiful frame on the outside. Every day I’m confronted with my reflection in the mirror as I haven’t yet had my breast reconstruction surgery. I also realise that I’ll never see the same person in the mirror again, neither emotionally nor physically.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=18

Tamara van Vlasselaer

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Tamara van Vlasselaer

Breast cancer has dramatically changed my life. It’s as if there is a life ‘before’ and ‘after’. Before the diagnosis, I was a very active and independent woman. As such, I was determined to have the same attitude as I continued doing everything that I did before. That soon turned out to be wishful thinking. Breast cancer gives you a different view of the world. It makes you realise that we, as humans, are only very small. That your health is your greatest wealth, as clichéd as that sounds. Love and friendship are central for me; The little things, happiness in life, and being surrounded by people who love you. That’s what everything ultimately revolves around.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=10

Christine Van den Bossche

My story

Raised so far

51.50

Christine Van den Bossche

Breast cancer took someone dear to me far too early. My godmother died of breast cancer 30 years ago, when I was just 14 years old. In her honour, I designed a ribbon. She gave me a photo album from our last holiday together. In it is a picture of her on a sunny day in a lavender field with a bundle of lavender in her arms. I’m always reminded of her when I see or smell lavender, hence the strip of lavender on the ribbon. The yellow background represents warmth or a beautiful day.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=47

Beverli Loucas

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Beverli Loucas

I haven’t been affected by breast cancer personally, but it has affected women close to me and I know I’m not immune. It’s been very difficult to watch my loved ones go through this ordeal and some have fallen into depression. I help them to smile again by introducing them to tattoo artists who redesign women’s breasts after cancer. This inspired my ribbon which is covered with drawings of breasts that represent the great diversity of women and breasts that exist, whether they’re affected by cancer or not.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=56

Lisa Janssens*

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Lisa Janssens*

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I found that I was stronger than I thought I would be, as I’m naturally very sensitive. The hardest part was waiting 10 days between the biopsy and the announcement of the disease. Then the day of the operation came. Despite the stress, I was really happy to finally have that filth removed from my body. My ribbon is in the shape of a heart because I think it’s very important to be well supported to get through every stage of this.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=62

Nathalie Appeltans

My story

Raised so far

10.60

Nathalie Appeltans

My battle with breast cancer will forever be a part of me. I am proud to have beaten this disease. The hardest part was the chemotherapy. When I found out my tumour was gone, I wanted to stop my treatment, but my oncologist told me to continue. And then the day of my last chemotherapy session came. Finally, the long treatment would end, and I knew I’d feel better every day. Since then, carpe diem has become my motto. I take the time to please myself and those around me. My ribbon is decorated with multicoloured smileys in the shape of flowers. I chose them for their smiles, and because they represent hope to me. Despite the illness, there are always beautiful moments to be seized. Nothing is impossible.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=49

Tine Veldeman

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Tine Veldeman

When I felt something in my chest that wasn’t supposed to be there, I went to the gynaecologist with fear in my heart. I quickly convinced myself that it might be nothing. But the moment the doctor confirms that it is good that you came, the world comes to a standstill. You can think of nothing else. The verdict was malignant. But there were silver linings: no metastases, treatable, and a plan for a complete recovery. An enormous fighting spirit emerged in me. There is hope! That’s why I picked a pink ribbon with two purple hands connected by a pink heart in the middle. I wanted to keep the happy pink hues even though breast cancer is not rosy.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=45

Annette Van Hoof

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Annette Van Hoof

I’m so grateful that I still get to wake up every morning. And you can see this in my ribbon. Four-leaf clovers surrounded by rays of sunshine with a little cloud in it. Four-leaf clovers and sunbeams because you’re supposed to enjoy life, nothing is mandatory, and everything is allowed! How I enjoyed my first day back at work 10 months after my diagnosis. That was possibly the best moment during the entire illness. Finally, back to normal life.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=28

Kathleen Vertessen

My story

Raised so far

10.60

Kathleen Vertessen

Breast cancer is like a rollercoaster. You know the moment you stepped on, but you don’t know when the ride will end. During this difficult period, it’s necessary to change your mind from time to time and to find support so that you can remain as positive as possible. Because you realise that you’ll never be the same again – mentally or physically. You’ll never be able to do all the same things as before. You’ll have to face many questions and deal with uncertainties. At such times, you can use all the support you can get.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=11

Veerle Van Roeyen

My story

Raised so far

279.00

Veerle Van Roeyen

I’ve already gone through several phases of change. From a carefree life to pure insecurity. Bald. Lost two breasts. Soon I’ll start radiation treatment and more physical damage may follow. What is most beautiful to me during this dark period is the way my 10-year-old daughter is handling the situation. She has accepted all the changes that have taken place over the past few months. She takes good care of me, thinks my scars are cool and smears them with cream. This is the inspiration for my ribbon: acceptance is half the battle. I accept that I am sick and have to undergo drastic treatments. I accept that I’ll have a different body, temporarily and permanently. But others accept me for who I am and how I look now, and that gives me enormous support.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=17

Caroline Collard

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Caroline Collard

For me, breast cancer is being catapulted into the essence of life at record speed. It’s a rock-hard confrontation with your own mortality, embracing the realisation that our time on this fascinating blue globe may be shorter than we would like. More than ever before, each day counts. Breast cancer strips human relationships of all noise. I found myself in a bath of support and warmth. At the same time, it no longer takes any effort for me to distance myself from people who take more energy than they give. Breast cancer sometimes seems like a crash course in self-preservation and self-actualisation. I seem to shine at living in the now and enjoy it immensely.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=2

Ella Cornelis

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Ella Cornelis

When I was 10 years old, my Mum was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer. I had to grow up fast and help take care of her. I divided the ribbon into several pink boxes. These boxes represent the wasting periods you go through when you have or are exposed to breast cancer. Some of the boxes are bigger than others because some periods last longer than others. Even if you’re declared cured, breast cancer changes and determines the rest of your life and your outlook on it.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=43

Joke Hillewaert

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Joke Hillewaert

Experiencing breast cancer is an intense journey for you and the people round you. It has made me realise that there is only the now, the good moments and the less good ones, which are also allowed. It also made me realise that what seems intense now can be different tomorrow. It’s the way you look at the situations in your life that helps you move forward! I live every minute more intensely and consciously, looking at what I really want in life and who I really am. This has shaped me into the woman I am today. Going through the disease has made me more aware of life. It has changed the way I am in life: from being the woman who based her life on the expectations of others to being who I really am. It’s taught me that self-care is just as important as caring for others.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=3

Aline Franssen

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Aline Franssen

I haven’t had breast cancer, but I know it’s waiting for me. Many women in my family and circle of friends have suffered from it and still do. I was very scared when I felt a lump in my left breast during a mammogram at the age of 41. It was a huge relief when I was told it was only a benign functional cyst. Cancer affects all breasts and it’s different for everyone. So, I designed a ribbon that celebrates the diversity of women’s breasts by depicting them in a playful and colourful way in the form of small fried eggs, watermelons, tangerines, and melons.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=52

I support all

My story

Raised so far

122.68

I support all

Breast cancer is anything but a rose-coloured story. It is a harsh and painful reality that affects 1 woman out of 9 in the course of their life, and men are not spared from it either. Are you also deeply touched by all the stories and ribbons you have come across on this platform? And would you therefore like to support each of these designers? You can! By donating to this ribbon, compiled from the different designs, you can support all the ribbon designers. Because fighting breast cancer is something you never do alone!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=64

Elke Cuypers

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Elke Cuypers

Thanks to breast cancer, and with the support of my husband, I only do things that I love and that make me stronger. I now have my own gallery and studio where I paint and teach myself. In my paintings I can express my feelings and emotions. I painted more during my chemo treatments, as this helped to get me through this difficult period. I find that I can be happy, and I wish that to everyone. That’s why there’s a four-leaf clover on the ribbon. Unfortunately, not everyone is that lucky, the butterfly on my artwork is for my niece who died of cancer.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=8

Monique Rombaut

My story

Raised so far

37.10

Monique Rombaut

I designed my ribbon during my many radiotherapy sessions. It’s painted on silk and symbolises my personal breast cancer story, yet fellow suffers immediately recognise themselves in it. Confronting my reflection in the mirror with a mutilated breast was the most difficult moment for me. But I don’t let the fire of life in me go out. It’s not all negative. I can say that thanks to breast cancer, I’m more aware of life. I enjoy every moment and I’m grateful for the support of my partner and my son. The disease has definitely made me stronger.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=20

Ann Vermeylen

My story

Raised so far

5.00

Ann Vermeylen

You lead a very normal life until you suddenly get the call: ‘Suspicious tissue has been found’. Before the diagnosis, I had a fairly positive outlook on life. Being stricken with breast cancer strengthened this, giving me even more zest for life. Because negative thoughts don’t give you a positive life, I designed a happy ribbon with all kinds of different, brightly coloured breasts on it. A ribbon that causes you to smile when you see it.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=44

Fabienne Riguel

My story

Raised so far

15.90

Fabienne Riguel

I experienced breast cancer as a battle. I fought because I wanted to survive for my daughters, aged 9 and 13. Throughout this difficult ordeal, I could always count on my family’s unconditional support; Before I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I was always stressed. The disease taught me to put things into perspective and live day by day. On my ribbon, I simply put the phrase ‘my fight, my life, my family’, which represents how I experienced the disease.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=51

Françoise Moors

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Françoise Moors

It was difficult to hear that I was sick. Fortunately, I was able to count on the support of my friends and family during my battle. My only memory of breast cancer is the happiness that the people around me and my colleagues gave me. I’d like to thank the Bordet Institute where I was treated. Nurses, doctors, volunteers, … They are all wonderful people. My ribbon is multicoloured with stars representing my two tumours. This is how I explained my diagnosis to my young daughter: little stars that go back into the sky.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=61

Alexia Hertogs

My story

Raised so far

31.80

Alexia Hertogs

For many women, losing their hair is the most difficult moment. For me, it was the loss of my eyelashes and eyebrows, because I didn’t recognise myself anymore. To find myself again, I kept looking beautiful every day, using special false eyelashes that are suitable for people undergoing chemotherapy. That was my way to keep fighting. My ribbon is covered in glitter and rhinestones because we need to shine in these moments. I want to show that you can be sick without letting yourself down.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=59

Leen Potums

My story

Raised so far

141.90

Leen Potums

Breast cancer has taken a lot from me: my left breast, a piece of my femininity, a piece of naivety. Fortunately, it’s also taught me a lot, new friendships have sprung up and old ones have been confirmed or renewed. What the cancer diagnosis taught me above all is to put things into perspective. Everyday worries about work or banal conflicts with friends or family are all things that you put into perspective after a cancer diagnosis. I’m much more positive now. Plus, I’ve realised that I’m stronger than I thought. Despite the fatigue, the pain, and the difficult moments, I won’t give up! I’m thankful that I’m still alive, that I have a chance of being cured, and that I have a great safety net of friends and family who continue to stand by me.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=1

An Cornelis-Vleminckx

My story

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An Cornelis-Vleminckx

In late 2014 I was diagnoses with type 3 breast cancer with metastases in the lymph nodes. Four invasive, fast-growing tumours. The hardest part of my breast cancer story was realising that my life will never be the same as before. You’re not the same person physically or mentally, so you can’t follow the lives of those you hold dear and are close to you. My ribbon combines pink and black. On the black side, I put a pink heart with the symbols: OO / O- / -O / --. This represents the love and warmth I want to give all my fellow suffers, whether they have two breasts, one breast, or none.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=42

Fanny De Lodder

My story

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0.00

Fanny De Lodder

Having breast cancer felt like a real rollercoaster. A ride that you’re put on against your will, and you can’t get off. Everything is decided and arranged for you. As a result, I started doing more things that I really want to do. Does it fit into my planning? Do it! I don’t procrastinate anymore, nor do I look at prices as much. The jumbled lines in my ribbon design represent the trapped feelings that you have. The rollercoaster cars go up and down, as do your many emotions and feelings during this time. But I was not alone: the tremendous support of many different friends made a substantial difference.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=25

Kathelijn Bormans

My story

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Kathelijn Bormans

Rationally, you know you’re not immortal. Yet it’s still a shock to get the diagnosis and really feel your own mortality. That feeling lingers like a small scar in your mind, reminding you to get everything out of life. That’s why my ribbon says, ‘At the end of this line, I’ll be fine’. Words give me strength. If you believe that things will be fine, then things are more likely to work out. I also used symbols like fast forward arrows and the infinity sign. You want to move forward as fast as possible to get better again, and you can draw enormous strength from the infinite love of the people around you.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=40

Ineke Roosen

My story

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0.00

Ineke Roosen

My life has changed positively since the day I got breast cancer. I started living differently, more consciously. I’m less likely to get caught up in small concerns with my kids or annoyances at work. I’m also not who I used to be, not my body and not my mind. I still face the effects of the disease and treatments every day. My body has taken a beating, it takes time to bounce back, and I feel it. The medication leaves its mark, and you have to learn to live with it. And the fear remains, both for me and for my family. We don’t know what tomorrow will bring, so we live consciously today.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=7

Greta Grouwels

My story

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Greta Grouwels

Since the diagnosis, my life has changed completely. As for many women, losing my hair was a very difficult moment. But I stayed positive and turned disbelief and denial into strength and the will to survive. Carpe diem is now my motto. I wanted to reflect my life and experiences in the ribbon. So, I divided it into three blocks. The first block represents the period before diagnosis, a period of constant ups and downs. An overly busy job, little to no me-time, constantly pushing boundaries, all the way to burnout. The second block is the period of treatment, a real rollercoaster of disbelief, denial, and anger. The third block symbolises moving on with your life and finding a nice balance again. Dressed in positivity, you’ll find the strength to take up the fight against the big C and win it too!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=32

Yinthe Vanderhauwert

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Yinthe Vanderhauwert

Being affected by breast cancer has shown me how valuable life is. It taught me to put things into perspective and slow down. It further strengthened my connection with partner and daughters. They are an unconditional support for me. That’s why my ribbon has colourful bridges that take us from one moment to the next. Bridges that lead us to difficult paths, but also to beautiful places, with little pockets of love and strength along the way. No matter how hard the path or which path we follow, there are always intensely beautiful moments.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=38

Sophie Van den Eynde

My story

Raised so far

26.50

Sophie Van den Eynde

The fact that I was fighting breast cancer 5 years ago is not entirely negative for me as it made me realise that I had to take more time for myself. As cliché as it sounds, I really enjoy the little things more now. Before the diagnosis, I had a lot of dreams that I wanted to realise, like following a graphic design course. That dream has since come true. So, I designed my ribbon myself using the knowledge I gained during that course. The many flowers I received were one of the little joys I appreciated immensely. Flowers make you instantly happy and brighten you up completely. They reflect how I felt during this period and how I think back on it: hopeful and positive.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=31

Charlotte Klaes

My story

Raised so far

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Charlotte Klaes

The design of my ribbon was inspired by my journal, reflecting what I’ve been through. Keeping a diary during the treatments helped me to give everything its place and process it. Because breast cancer makes you sad and scared, I hesitate longer before making decisions. I’ve found that I can express all my doubts in my diary. I’m also grateful to the beautiful moments. My trip to the Efteling with the whole family is one memory I’ll never forget!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=22

Sandra Charlier

My story

Raised so far

26.50

Sandra Charlier

For so many people, it’s ‘just breast cancer’. They don’t realise how it changes your life. I know many people in my life who have battled breast cancer, like my Mum. Some successfully, others sadly not. Daily, the fear of cancer returning reigns supreme. So, I’ve made my ribbon bright pink with puzzle pieces. Breast cancer causes you to puzzle things out in order not to lose each other and be there for each other. And, although puzzle pieces sometimes separate from each other, like people in certain situations, they always fit back together. I never left my Mum alone through her diagnosis and treatment, we’re like two puzzle pieces that are inextricably linked.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=41

Nathalie Dewandeleer

My story

Raised so far

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Nathalie Dewandeleer

When I went to bed one night, I felt a small painful lump in my breast. I immediately thought of breast cancer and said to myself, ‘Now you need to have fun and do all the things you never took the time to do before you turned 45’. March 16, 2022, marked five years since my breast tumour was removed. A symbolic date. Because that’s when the right to forget starts. It completes a chapter in my life that I will never forget and that reminded me how important it is to think of myself. My ribbon is decorated with little pink flying hearts that symbolises the love we have for each other and for those around us who support us during this ordeal.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=57

Martine Nys

My story

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Martine Nys

It’s a huge cliché, but good health is the most precious commodity you can own. And you shouldn’t take it for granted. When you’re stricken with breast cancer, you know that being healthy is a gift from heaven. What I considered mundane and normal before, suddenly becomes important and special. I enjoy the little things in life more. Since I was afflicted by breast cancer, my life motto has been get it out and keep the courage in.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=14

Isabelle Vansteenkiste

My story

Raised so far

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Isabelle Vansteenkiste

After my breast cancer diagnosis, I was given early retirement. Losing my job was very difficult to live with. I wanted to feel useful again and started volunteering. I now teach knitting workshops, which is my passion, and I have a blog where I share my creations, explanations, and useful tips. Volunteering has helped me to rebuild my life. So, my ribbon shows how knitting has helped me to regain a social life and saved me from depression. It’s pink with a ball of wool at one end and the thread running the length of the ribbon to form a heart at the other end.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=54

Wendy Dhondt

My story

Raised so far

5.30

Wendy Dhondt

It might be strange to say this or write it down, but I don’t think my experience with breast cancer has been entirely negative. It has given me tremendous strength and made me a very optimistic woman. The realisation that your life can suddenly be over has given me a boost to enjoy life even more. Shaving off my hair, was undoubtedly one of the toughest tasks I had to do – if not the toughest. And yet I am grateful to be able to wake up every day, even without my normal full head of hair. The best moment was when the first hair popped back onto my head.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=4

Nina Jacobs*

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Nina Jacobs*

Breast cancer caused me grief and damaged my body. The stage of simulation and tattooing in preparation for radiotherapy was very trying. It felt like a second attack on my body, now marked by signs of the disease. This experience taught me to enjoy the beautiful things in my life more. Although my ‘adventure’ unfortunately opened my eyes to the dark side of some of my loved ones, it also allowed me to meet some amazing people. For my ribbon, I chose a series of words written in different colours and fonts to appeal to as many people as possible. Every woman has her own breast cancer story. For one patient one word is important, but for another it means little. The pink background represents the group that unites us.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=55

Aurore Duveau

My story

Raised so far

0.00

Aurore Duveau

The breast cancer diagnosis felt like a heavy truck running over me. The night after, you think there is the possibility that your children will lose their mother. In that moment, the disease changed my life. You realise that everything can stop when you are just in your thirties. You tell yourself that above all you have to enjoy every moment. With my ribbon, I want to represent my story by using different shades of pink: from dark to bright pink, with some variations. Dark for sadness, bright pink for the determination you need to get through it, light pink for the lack of strength you have during chemotherapy, a few darker spots for bad days, and increasingly intense glitter pink for the success of the treatment.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=60

Sylvie De Bruyne

My story

Raised so far

206.10

Sylvie De Bruyne

My life has completely changed, both mentally and physically. The realisation that cancer is present in your body and the terrible fear of what stage it is in. What a relief it was to be told that the cyst on my ovaries was benign. So, the whole disease process is very changeable, like the weather. And you have no control over the weather either, just like with breast cancer. For me, the outcome remains hopeful, because the sun is shining behind the clouds, right?

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=27

Katleen Roels

My story

Raised so far

10.60

Katleen Roels

The breast cancer diagnosis was a very profound event in my life. One that changed my life from one minute to the next. The radiologist told me the verdict: it was a very aggressive form, but fortunately without metastases. As a self-employed hairdresser, I’ve cut the hair of so many of my customers short, on their way to their chemotherapy. Now it was my turn. I was fortunate that my husband worked in the medical assistance department, so he could take care of me, and I wasn’t alone during corona. On my ribbon I’ve placed harpoons that refer to the negative (the tumour) and indicate where it is. The negative is removed by the positive in life!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=15

Cassiane Le Page

My story

Raised so far

31.80

Cassiane Le Page

After having breast cancer, life gave me a second chance and I really became aware of its value. Today I dare to try new things, to surpass myself and my fears. I want to live and feel alive, enjoying every moment and putting difficulties into perspective. There have been difficult moments during my journey, but I think that the post-cancer period has been the hardest for me. The medical visits gradually fade away and you suddenly feel alone. People have already moved on because you look fine on the outside, even if your body is a battlefield on the inside. My ribbon represents the lifeline of a heartbeat. It starts with the cancer astrological sign, the self-invited tenant, before going through a series of ups and downs that symbolise the journey to healing before ending with the infinity sigh.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=50

Nancy Aillery

My story

Raised so far

85.60

Nancy Aillery

Before I got breast cancer, I took my good health for granted. After the diagnosis, I stopped procrastinating and started living more in the ‘now’ and enjoying life. Although there were periods of pain, they alternated with periods of hope. I’m enormously grateful that the heavy treatments helped and I’m still alive. My ribbon connects all those different feelings and experiences. The red piece with the lightning bolts represents the intense pain you experience. I had to stop hormone therapy because I had too much muscle and joint pain. The green part represents hope, growth, life, and spring. The wavy lines represent the future. Everyone dealing with breast cancer is gold and deserves a gold medal. As a jewelry designer, I’d like to express this with a golden button that can be used to attach 'the ribbon'.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=35

Martine Lemmens

My story

Raised so far

104.50

Martine Lemmens

Breast cancer has affected me psychologically, emotionally, and physically. A year after my reconstruction, I still frequently have stomach problems. The few girlfriends I had have abandoned me. Fortunately, I could count on the unconditional support of my husband and children. The corona crisis also made it a very lonely ‘adventure’. I had to do everything on my own, from the hospital appointments to the surgeries. However, I was relieved that it wasn’t an aggressive cancer. Throughout the process you get so many changing thoughts and feelings. The rainbow on my ribbon symbolises these many ups and downs, acting as a bridge between the rain and the sun, so to speak. Because after the rain comes sunshine.

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=63

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