Amount raised

€5.053

  • Cathérine just donated €10.60
  • Alexandra just donated €26.50
  • Rymond just donated €50
  • Gilles just donated €21.20
  • Sarah just donated €20
  • Petra just donated €21.20
  • Fleur just donated €50
  • J just donated €10.60
  • Jolien just donated €5
  • Véronique just donated €10
  • Martina just donated €5.30
  • Martina just donated €5.30
  • Chris just donated €10
  • Stephanie just donated €53
  • Fran just donated €10.60
  • Dries just donated €5.30
  • Sil just donated €30
  • Greet just donated €21.20
  • Elodie just donated €21.20
  • Karolien just donated €31.80

Which ribbon do you support? 

Pink Ribbon asked (former) breast cancer patients and those around them to design a ribbon to express how they cope with the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. We received many gripping stories and beautiful meaningful ribbon designs. You can find them on this website. 

These are the courageous testimonies of (ex-)breast cancer patients, but also of their loved ones in their close circle who have been affected by the disease. These are their stories, their ribbons: honest and poignant, pink but sometimes with a black edge. Because breast cancer is not an exclusively rosy story: not for the breast cancer patients, nor for those around them. The support for cancer patients and those around them is much needed. Show your support and sponsor a ribbon that speaks the most to you.

Top 10 ribbons

1

Yves Pauwels

Raised so far

1,006.98

2

Tes Van Opstal

Raised so far

578.01

3

Joke Buijs

Raised so far

455.00

4

Delphine Delvaux

Raised so far

417.08

5

Deborah Vermandel

Raised so far

348.80

6

Anne-Catherine

Raised so far

251.00

7

I support all ribbons

Raised so far

230.66

8

Marleen

Raised so far

168.90

9

Maddy De Bleser

Raised so far

156.60

10

Charlotte Jeuris

Raised so far

156.28

11

Ine

Raised so far

144.50

Ann Vranken

More info

Raised so far

47.40

Ann Vranken

"Breast cancer confronted me with the finality of life. Since then, I take so much more pleasure from the big and little things in life and I no longer worry about the things I can’t change anyway. The heavy chemotherapy put my life on hold but the love and support of my family and friends pulled me through. My father understands me really well with so few words, it’s wonderful to be so well-attuned to each other. The toddlers in my class let me know they missed me, that was really heartwarming. My ribbon is full of hearts because everyone needs that love so badly."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=9

Frederic Desauw

More info

Raised so far

53.00

Frederic Desauw

"My wife was diagnosed with breast cancer when COVID was in full swing. We had three young boys at the time and that meant my plate was full: not just the care for my wife but also for my family, and an uncertain future. Since then we are more aware of the importance of ‘carpe diem’. We do crazy stuff once in a while, jump off cliffs, exercise more intensely, we spend more time with each other and, most importantly, we are closer than we already were. We choose to focus on the things and people we’ve met instead of dwelling on what we’ve lost. We made spur-of-the-moment decisions and went on holiday. Thanks to the sports project ‘Sterkk’ for cancer survivors, we spend more time in the water together, for a new year’s dive in the sea and swimming in open water.

The waves on my ribbon symbolise the power of nature but also the ebb and flow of emotions and dark moments that alternate with good periods and gratitude. The water also represents connection and hope."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=36

Chris Tahon

More info

Raised so far

53.00

Chris Tahon

"Since I was diagnosed with breast cancer my life has changed completely in many respects. For instance, together with my team ‘De Bende van d’Ostendsche Chris’ we focus on raising funds for Relay for Life, an initiative by the Foundation against Cancer. One of the finest moments in my breast cancer journey came during treatment, when I was still able to enter a running race. The American Cancer Society gave me the title ‘Global Hero of Hope’.

My ribbon has stars in different colours because breast cancer affects everyone, regardless of origin, religion or colour. During the treatment you are the centre of attention and if you beat it you’re a star. If, unfortunately, you don’t make it, then you will still shine forever like a star in the sky."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=5

Joni L.

More info

Raised so far

5.30

Joni L.

"Two years ago, I was only 22, I had my breasts examined. I was wary because breast cancer runs in my family. Unfortunately, the doctors told me they could see a number of swellings. I had to have a biopsy right away and naturally I was very frightened. Fortunately the pieces of tissue they removed turned out to be benign. What a relief. Nevertheless, I’ve been having yearly check-ups since then. My message is to regularly examine your own breasts and have them checked by a doctor. In many cases breast cancer is still discovered too late, so be aware and get tested!"

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=2

She

More info

Raised so far

0.00

She

"Being told that I had cancer caused an explosion of emotions. From the moment the diagnosis was known, the waiting was torture, I really thought I was going to die. Breast cancer was no stranger to me as my mother and aunt also had it, yet I never believed it would happen to me too.

Fortunately, I immediately felt surrounded by several bubbles: family, friends and the medical staff. Their support and love gave me the courage to keep fighting. My children were my best medicine during treatment, as was my friend who always helped me keep believing in it and sent positive vibes.

The disease enabled me to let go of things and reframe my life with a positive mindset. My journey is not quite over, I recently underwent a double mastectomy and reconstruction, but today I feel light and serene."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=25

Ann Vanveldhoven

More info

Raised so far

98.00

Ann Vanveldhoven

"After your diagnosis life simply grinds to a halt. You’re torn away from your ‘normal’ life and your social network. It’s all about the treatment now and you’re focused on your recovery. When my hair fell out and the port catheter was installed I realised I truly was a patient. But the warmth, love and friendship of those closest to me helped me through it.

My ribbon has both sunflowers as a sign of warmth and hope, and forget-me-nots because it’s important for those around you to keep involving you in everyday life while you’re battling the disease."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=39

Brigitte Bip Geens

More info

Raised so far

73.00

Brigitte Bip Geens

"When I was diagnosed with breast cancer I was completely overwhelmed. I underwent everything, the chemo that makes you so sick, the radiation therapy that’s so exhausting. Every time I looked in the mirror I was confronted with a different ‘me’, with obvious scars, a damaged breast and a pale, ashen colour. Twelve years after my diagnosis they also found bone cancer in my hip, a remnant of the breast cancer. Now I really am ‘disabled’ and I have to be careful how I move and go. My best and most hopeful moments were both times when I was diagnosed and the oncologist told me: “We’re going to help you, you will heal and you don’t have to die.”

My ribbon represents a string of people holding each other’s hand. Breast cancer can affect all of us, regardless of gender or colour or what you look like. Unfortunately it just happens and you have to get through it, whether you like it or not."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=17

Tine De Ridder

More info

Raised so far

42.40

Tine De Ridder

"My ribbon has the word ‘warrior’ in large print. Every day I feel like a fighter, a warrior. Everyone who is confronted with cancer can be a warrior. Keep fighting and enjoying the good things, both on good and bad days. And surround yourself with as many kind people as possible.

Breast cancer changed my outlook on life. Nowadays I consciously choose what I want and what I feel like, and I enjoy life twice as much. After seven years I was told I had relapsed and that was really hard. Fortunately there was another therapy that gave good results. The support and the understanding of everyone around me helps me stay positive."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=14

Sofie Schippers

More info

Raised so far

16.22

Sofie Schippers

"I used to think having two healthy breasts was normal. Now I see it as a gift. Some time ago I had a breast augmentation done. And it was around that time that a friend of mine told me she was undergoing treatment for breast cancer. I felt quite guilty towards her at the time because I had my healthy breasts operated on and she wasn’t that lucky.

Today I’m glad I can give something back to the countless women affected by breast cancer. They don’t have to go through this alone. All of us together we can lift their spirits, as you can see on my ribbon. The heart shapes represent all different types of breasts, the rainbow colours stand for the fact that breast cancer affects everyone: not just the ill woman but also her husband, children, relatives, colleagues, friends, neighbours... Everyone is confronted with it sooner or later."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=3

Anne

More info

Raised so far

5.30

Anne

"I felt a great desire to fight cancer, I wanted to do it for my husband, children and grandchildren. For them, I kept myself as strong as possible. Unfortunately, my husband has since died of cancer himself. Therefore, my ribbon depicts a love dove, it symbolises my love for my late husband. Together we fought cancer, love will always connect us."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=19

Renate Beele i.s.m. Lisa Laperre

More info

Raised so far

15.90

Renate Beele i.s.m. Lisa Laperre

"I prefer to look ahead and surround myself with positive people. Thanks to the cancer rehabilitation I got better and stronger, step by step. It feels so good to move, you start to feel better in your skin again, you recognise your own strength and start to believe in your own abilities!

In hindsight the disease has made me stronger and that strength is central in my ribbon design. I wish everyone the strength to overcome cancer and a recovery process in which exercise is the key to a stronger self."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=23

Annie Nevraumont

More info

Raised so far

0.00

Annie Nevraumont

"After years without any contact, I got back in touch with my sister Sonia who was fighting breast cancer. We experienced five years of intense happiness and enjoyed life to the fullest. Until she sadly lost the battle against cancer.

At her funeral, she left us a beautiful text: 'When the caterpillar thinks it is done, it turns into a butterfly.' My sister also turned into a butterfly and flew to the heaven above us."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=26

I support all ribbons

More info

Raised so far

230.66

I support all ribbons

Are you deeply touched by all the stories and ribbons that you see on this website? And would you like to support all the designers? You can do so by donating to this pink ribbon. It symbolizes all of the touching stories that we received of breast cancer patients and those around them. By donating to this ribbon, you give them a heart to heart. Because fighting breast cancer is something you never do alone!

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=42

Ine

More info

Raised so far

144.50

Ine

"While the world took two steps forward, I took one step back - at least that’s what it felt like. The disease was a very tough period over which I had no control and that comes with a lot of sorrow.

The intertwined forget-me-nots on my ribbon represent the closeness with my family, friends and colleagues. They often caught me off guard with small gifts and fun surprises, there was even a walk with alpacas. The people around me showed me they were thinking of me and hadn’t forgotten me.

I will never forget what they did for me. Thank you."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=29

Nancy Syx

More info

Raised so far

53.00

Nancy Syx

"Breast cancer changed my life forever, I worry all the time now. When they told me after eight months the cancer had metastasised, my world collapsed again. Fortunately I’m responding well to the new chemo!

My ribbon is a string of bright and darker hues that represent the good and not-so-good moments you go through."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=40

Patrick Bastiaens

More info

Raised so far

132.20

Patrick Bastiaens

"Getting breast cancer as a man is rare enough, and it plunges you into a female-oriented world. My breast is gone but I don’t really miss it, I’m sure it’s a different story for women. That’s why I have tremendous respect for women with breast cancer because to them, a breast is not just a breast.

My first thought after my diagnosis was: ‘I’m the first man in Belgium to get breast cancer, how is this possible?’. I feared for my life and I couldn’t imagine my youngest grandchildren never getting to know me. Fortunately the surgical oncologist told me later there were no metastases and they would make sure I got to see my grandchildren grow up. Those few words gave me the strength to go for it."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=32

Yanaika

More info

Raised so far

42.44

Yanaika

"I think it’s important not to forget the previvors in the breast cancer debate. I underwent a preventive mastectomy at the age of 29 because I had inherited the breast cancer gene from my mother. This operation did change my life, I chose life.

My mum gave me tremendous support. She soothed me when I got the results and she thought I was so brave to get the operation done. Afterwards she had the same operation. My ribbon has two colours because you’re never alone."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=12

Delphine Delvaux

More info

Raised so far

417.08

Delphine Delvaux

"My illness has shown me that I have a lot of resilience. After I overcame a first breast cancer, I was diagnosed with another cancer: lung cancer this time. It was not metastases, but a genetic mutation. Fortunately, I am now well on the road to recovery again.

Thanks to my cancer, I have also been able to experience many beautiful moments. I was home from work for a year, which allowed me to spend a lot of time together with my daughters. I was happy to be there for them and help with their studies.

The flowers on my ribbon represent life at home and in the garden. Each flower represents a small gift I received from those around me."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=7

Charlotte Jeuris

More info

Raised so far

156.28

Charlotte Jeuris

"My aunt received the bad news that she had breast cancer. It not only had a huge impact on her but on our entire family as well. It changes your outlook on life. Fortunately my aunt recovered. One time our whole family went for a walk with our pink T-shirts on. That was a day we all greatly enjoyed, we felt so close to each other. And to her, of course.

My ribbon is composed of different breasts to illustrate the difference between all women. All combinations are possible because all breasts are different and they’re all beautiful. No one has to feel insecure about how they look, not even after an operation."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=35

Suzy Bellinkx

More info

Raised so far

20.00

Suzy Bellinkx

"My treatment coincided with the COVID pandemic, meaning I had to undergo almost all treatments, radiation sessions and tests by myself. My real friends and family were often there to cheer me up, they would knock on my window unexpectedly or they hung sweet messages, cards and surprises from the gate to lift my spirits.

For me there is a time before and after 2020. Physically there’s not much left. I’m working full-time again in a new job. The people close to me understand what I went through and that I can’t do everything like before.

My ribbon is full of small dots that symbolise the dark moments during those fourteen months. The lighter sections represent the good times."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=18

Dominique Decort

More info

Raised so far

15.30

Dominique Decort

"Your health is the most important thing, I realise that more than ever before. Your work is only relative because actually everyone is professionally expendable. As soon as I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I received enormous support: from family and friends, doctors and nurses, even from people I didn't expect. My ribbon represents the warmth and love I felt deeply during my battle."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=20

Nathalie Biltresse

More info

Raised so far

61.20

Nathalie Biltresse

"Getting breast cancer changed my life path profoundly. Even though the treatments are behind me, I cannot forget the cancer. There is still a taboo around life post-cancer. Still so often I feel like a tightrope walker searching for a shaky balance in everything that breast cancer entails. Also long after the diagnosis and endless treatments, you encounter many difficult moments: the constant fatigue, the fear of check-ups, but also, sadly, when a fellow sufferer gets bad news or loses the arms to keep fighting.

Enjoy the little things, that's my motto. Above all, enjoy the beautiful encounters that you have thanks to your cancer story. The support of nurses, doctors, fellow sufferers and even strangers brings a strong connection. The hands on my ribbon represent those beautiful contacts."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=33

Marie Claire Konix

More info

Raised so far

21.20

Marie Claire Konix

"Four words that capture the essence are on my ribbon. You can never lose hope, courage to carry on, the strength to hold on. And to top it all off there are the indispensable hugs from your loved ones. My cancer changed my life. It’s nice to be able to give something back to everyone who’s fighting cancer. That is why I designed this ribbon. Let’s all keep hoping for healing!"

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=31

Isabelle Leclercq

More info

Raised so far

63.60

Isabelle Leclercq

"Before my cancer, I was living at 200 kilometres per hour. "Why me?", I wondered when they diagnosed me. Yet I did not want to keep looking for an answer to this question, I decided to find a way into how I could give the disease a place in my life. Today, I see it more as a phase in my life rather than an ordeal: a phase that forced me to go to the essence, take time for myself and experience everything to the fullest with those around me. Despite my illness, I have never felt so alive.

Thanks to a positive mindset, I can look back at this period in the way I do. Day after day, I feel surrounded by the support of my family and friends, colleagues and medical staff. I am immensely grateful to them for their positive vibes, because that became my weapon to fight against the disease."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=24

SVdm

More info

Raised so far

26.50

SVdm

"Cancer throws you into rapids, a vortex that sends you on a complex medical rollercoaster. There is no time to lose, but no time to feel either. You become disoriented and you get lost in the uncertainty. That is when you need the people around you. They can help you stop the tsunami just by being there, listening to you, giving you fresh courage so you can go on again.

Enduring the exhausting chemo sessions was hard but every time you have to find the courage to go to the hospital. I received so much support from different people. That support and the unconditional love of my husband are what got me through this.

The dark colours in my ribbon represent the cancer that has a grip on you. The light colours stand for courage, femininity and the future."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=28

Anne-Catherine

More info

Raised so far

251.00

Anne-Catherine

"When you get breast cancer, many painful moments pile up: having to tell the bad news to those around you, the realization, no longer being able to hide the disease or the scars that constantly remind you of it. Strangely enough, for me, the aftermath in particular is a real ordeal. The many check-ups make it difficult to distance yourself from the illness, you have lost your self-confidence and your worry-free attitude.

When you are sick you are out of the game. Unfortunately, some people gradually remove you from their lives. This is painful, but it also opens a way to new, more meaningful relationships, for example with people going through the same thing. And of course, there are also the people who will always be there, despite your illness and limitations. The faces in one continuous line on my ribbon represent that friendship and love."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=41

Deborah Vermandel

More info

Raised so far

348.80

Deborah Vermandel

"The diagnosis came as a bombshell. All of a sudden it felt as if I was sinking in quicksand. I lost control over everything I thought I had control over. The tornado of feelings and emotions made me giddy. All at once the tables had turned and I was one of the countless cancer patients. The other, for whom I was always there, was now standing at my side. Now the many onlookers and supporters were here for me.

I am no longer the successful businesswoman, no longer the sexy wife for my husband. I am a woman who lost herself but who is rediscovering herself now. With my new first name Deborah it feels as if I’m reborn. I’m raring to go, I just need to find the strength to choose the right direction after the starting shot.

My ribbon has angel wings because angels are a recurring feature in my life. Also, you need the patience of a saint to get through this terrible battle. I was fortunate enough to go through my cancer therapy in our cottage in Italy, which is full of angels. More than anything, there’s always a guardian angel nearby when you’re fighting cancer."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=38

Dominique Vermeylen

More info

Raised so far

63.60

Dominique Vermeylen

"Breast cancer changed the course of my life. When I was diagnosed I had one year left before retirement. I was really sorry that the disease forced me to give up my job before that. But what really had the biggest impact was the removal of my entire left breast and nine axillary lymph nodes. However bad that was, there is still light at the end of the tunnel. Today I’m still undergoing treatment so I haven’t reached the end of my journey yet. My ribbon looks like an infinity symbol because there’s always hope and hope springs eternal. That’s my creed."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=8

Joke Buijs

More info

Raised so far

455.00

Joke Buijs

"Breast cancer turned my life upside down but most of all I try to focus on the positive life experience. I cannot describe the warmth that has surrounded me throughout this process and that has carried me through. Old friendships sprung back to life, colleagues and vague acquaintances became friends for life. I had more time for my family, bringing us even closer together, and I had more time to spend with my parents, brother and sister, and that’s so precious!

I look back upon it as a period in which I felt continually intertwined with others: my friends and family but also other cancer patients at the hospital. I was never alone. When I’d been on sick leave for nine months I constantly experienced beautiful moments in spite of all the misery. I’m grateful that during that period I felt so intertwined with and supported by the people around me."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=1

Mietje

More info

Raised so far

5.30

Mietje

"Being diagnosed with breast cancer had a huge impact, not just on myself but also on my family and friends. It’s not until you’re ill that you realise that you always said you have to seize the day but you never truly did. Suddenly your life turns into a rollercoaster. As soon as you’re diagnosed your car starts to roll: you are no longer able to make your own decisions, you’re just a passenger and it all goes so quickly. Your world is turned upside down, your body is turned inside out and you hardly have any energy left.

Fortunately you are also carried by so much love and science. For me it was the loving hugs from my family, small attentions, lovely words, and the understanding and support of patient specialists, nurses and organisations. Once you get off the rollercoaster you can pick up your life again. There’s no need to worry about what the future has in store, take it one day at a time and make the best of it."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=10

Katrien De Proft

More info

Raised so far

121.30

Katrien De Proft

"Since I had breast cancer I’m not afraid to hit the pause or even the stop button of my hectic life. The diagnosis and the many tests came at me at a frantic pace. I underwent everything in a daze without fully realising what I had to go through. At one point I had a scan with radioactive liquid and I couldn’t hold my son of barely four months. That’s when I started to realise what me and my family were in for.

But in what followed there were also many beautiful moments. After one of my last radiation sessions I saw in the mirror that the first downy hairs were growing back. That was a hopeful sign because my body was starting to mend. The wavy, curly, thick and thin lines on my ribbon represent the course of the disease, the loss and regrowth of hair."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=22

Yves Pauwels

More info

Raised so far

1,006.98

Yves Pauwels

"My sister Christl didn’t let cancer rule her life, she fought like a lioness. When she was just nineteen she overcame Hodgkin’s disease (a kind of lymphoma). The intense cancer treatments she had at the time defined much of her life. At a later age she was diagnosed with cancer again, breast cancer this time. She was eventually declared cured but she still suffered a relapse. Unfortunately, she passed away at the age of 53.

When you read this you may feel compassion but my sister never sat sulking in a corner, she never lost her lust for life. Even when we were told she was terminal, she stayed upbeat. She wore a hanger that said ‘live now’, something that also features on my ribbon. If you’re ill it’s important to live in the now. And be courageous and hopeful because medical science keeps evolving."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=4

Maddy De Bleser

More info

Raised so far

156.60

Maddy De Bleser

"For my ribbon I took inspiration from the support group Lenabeau. The motif consists of a variety of breasts because breast cancer has many different facets. Every patient, cancer and operation is different and so the outcome is different too.

After thirty years of marriage I finally realise just how much my husband loves me and that he would do anything for me. It makes me so profoundly happy that I get to experience so much love."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=27

Tes Van Opstal

More info

Raised so far

578.01

Tes Van Opstal

"I was ten when my mother got breast cancer, I noticed she got tired much faster and couldn’t do much. When she was ill we made lots of jigsaw puzzles because the chemo wore her out and she couldn’t do anything active. After I had finished my homework my mum and I got started on a puzzle and after a few minutes my father and brother joined in. It was a kind of family outing, except it was at home.

Family is kind of a puzzle because you’re all connected with each other. The doctors and nurses always do their best to cure people. When two cancer patients share a room they also share their respective stories. They feel mutual understanding and they support each other. As with family, these people share a tighter bond."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=21

Véro

More info

Raised so far

5.30

Véro

"After seven years it still feels as if I’ve lost part of my femininity. Nevertheless, I’m very grateful I’m still here and I’m healthy, and aware of all the good things in life. Nowadays I’m vigilant and alert, self-care has become a huge priority in my life.

The entire cancer journey has been tumultuous and complex, like the design of my ribbon. The pink represents femininity, the grey is the dark side of the disease. It also has a gilded edge because life can still be beautiful in spite of the many tough moments."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=13

Marleen

More info

Raised so far

168.90

Marleen

"My friend is in the middle of her treatments for breast cancer. She still has a long way to go, longer than they first anticipated. However, she is very combative, remains positive and is doing everything that she can to be cured. I am so proud of her and continue to support her. I am very grateful that in between we can still do fun things together. Being ill gives you a different perspective on life. You realize that you have to enjoy every moment because life is so short.

My ribbon full of flowers symbolises the loving support for those going through the disease. The black borders are for mourning, for all the next of kin who, sadly, lost someone to the disease. Still, it’s mainly a colourful ribbon with sparkling hearts because in spite of everything you have to look to the future with a warm and hopeful heart."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=34

bonnieM

More info

Raised so far

5.30

bonnieM

"My ribbon looks like a rainbow because colours make for a joyful day, even if it gets off to a difficult start. Even though I don’t have breast cancer myself I’m still confronted with the disease. Because everyone knows someone who has or has had breast cancer.

Everyone around that person comes together to support the patient. Flowers can work wonders, or you can just show them the sun or the rainbow, which makes the day just that little bit more cheerful. Both a patient’s support system and the patient deserve extra attention and hopeful moments, that is what my ribbon is meant to project."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=16

Agnès Devos

More info

Raised so far

50.00

Agnès Devos

"It wasn't until I was diagnosed with breast cancer that I realised how important good health is. You can dream and plan everything you want, but an illness can just wipe it that away. Fortunately, the tumour is now gone and I am very happy with my breast reconstruction.

Every day is a new beginning and every woman getting better is a victory. The v's on my ribbon represent those small victories."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=30

Natascha Haesaert

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Raised so far

0.00

Natascha Haesaert

"Ever since I was diagnosed with breast cancer I’ve been afraid of death. My mother died from cervical cancer five years ago. Now that I’ve also been diagnosed with cancer I’m paralysed with fear.

On my ribbon there’s a pack of wolves. Wolves symbolise the strength to overcome the disease, they also stand for the love and support I received from the people around me. They protect me like a pack of wolves that I’m safely ensconced in."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=37

Vanessa Beerens

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Raised so far

20.00

Vanessa Beerens

"I feel insecure since my breast cancer diagnosis. The disease goes through a number of phases, each with its own challenges: processing the diagnosis; losing your hair, eyelashes and eyebrows; your chest is literally scarred; dealing with joint pains; the relationship with your partner is tested... My life changed completely and recovery is a long-term process.

Everything is different. You loose yourself and cannot recognise yourself. In the end you adapt your life to it and start to slowly recover, but the fear will always stay.

During this period it’s really difficult to feel a warm, genuine smile touch your lips. I feel small instances of gratitude when I’ve come through another shot, when I can dress again after a check-up or when I’m walking arm in arm with someone. The cancer journey comes with plenty of tears of fear and pain, but also tears of victory and little moments of happiness. Tears are the right symbol for my ribbon."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=11

Adeline Masuy

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Raised so far

21.20

Adeline Masuy

"I was 13 when my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. I remember a day when I was with my mum who was sick in a shop and my friends were also there. I didn't want them to see her because I was afraid that they would laugh at her for not having hair and wearing a scarf around her head. At that moment, I flipped a switch, I no longer wanted to hide myself and my mum - the woman I love most. I gave her a big hug in the middle of the shop in front of everyone.

My mum was not feeling well at the time. I decided to help her do her make-up, pick out scarves that matched her outfits and I encouraged her to wear more colour. Today, my mother is the most colourful and sparkling woman I know.

The branches on my ribbon represent the life journey of anyone that is fighting cancer. At the beginning of the battle, the branches are still bare, but gradually new buds appear. Finally, the blossoms of the Japanese cherry tree bloom, representing healing and new life after cancer. My mum's gynaecologist once told her: 'As soon as spring returns and the birds sing, you will never see or hear them the same way again.'"

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=6

Inge Peeters

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Raised so far

2.12

Inge Peeters

"My ribbon has a butterfly because it refers to an action logo my friends designed especially for me. Because - can I be honest? I have a pretty hard time dealing with all the confronting moments that come with breast cancer. Your self-image changes constantly and you don’t have the time to get used to it every time. First there was the breast amputation, then chemo that makes you lose your hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. And there’s always the physical pain.

Fortunately I get a lot of support from everywhere. On the one hand I lost people that I thought would always be there for me but precisely by being so open about my disease I have also gained so many new and wonderful friendships."

https://pinksupport.pink-ribbon.be/event/ribbon/home?ribbon=15

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